Development/ zygote/embryo/fetus/rooting reflex/attachment/contact comfort

laughing baby playing with mother

Day 1 – conception takes place

7 days – tiny human implants in mother’s uterus

10 days – mother’s menses stop

18 days – heart begins to beat

21 days – pumps own blood through separate close circulatory system with own blood type

28 days – eye, ear, and respiratory system begin to form

42 days – brain waves recorded skeleton complete, reflexes present

7 weeks – capable of thumb sucking

8 weeks – all body systems present

9 weeks – squints, swallows, moves tongue, makes fist

11 weeks – spontaneous breathing movements, has fingernails, all body systems working

12 weeks – weighs one ounce

16 weeks – genital organs clearly differentiated, grasps with hands, swims, kicks, turns, somersaults, ( still not felt by the mother)

18 weeks – vocal cords work

20 weeks – has hair on head, weighs one pound, 12 inches long

23 weeks – 15% chance of viability outside of womb if birth premature

24 weeks – 56% of babies survive premature birth

25 weeks – 79% of babies survive  premature birth

Source: Outline in Obstetrics, 2004 edition by Maria Loreto J. Evangelista-Sia

Conception to Birth TED video

Conception to Birth TED video

WORD OF THE DAY: COPY Teratogens-toxic substances that can harm the fetus Ex. drugs, alcohol, nicotine, viruses such as HIV and AIDS Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS)

Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is a set of physical and mental birth defects that can result from a woman drinking alcohol during her pregnancy. The syndrome is characterized by brain damage, facial deformities, and growth deficits.

Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is a set of physical and mental birth defects that can result from a woman drinking alcohol during her pregnancy. The syndrome is characterized by brain damage, facial deformities, and growth deficits.

Boy with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

Boy with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

Know rooting reflex, moro reflex, babinski reflex

Know rooting reflex, moro reflex, babinski reflex

Ainsworth place an infant in unfamiliar room filled with a variety of toys. A few minutes later, a strange person entered the room, and the mother left. The mother returned a few minutes later and then repeated the pattern of leaving and returning.   Securely attached infants responded to the Strange Situation by using their mother as a "secure base" to explore the room and displayed a positive reaction to their mother.

Ainsworth place an infant in unfamiliar room filled with a variety of toys. A few minutes later, a strange person entered the room, and the mother left. The mother returned a few minutes later and then repeated the pattern of leaving and returning. Securely attached infants responded to the Strange Situation by using their mother as a “secure base” to explore the room and displayed a positive reaction to their mother.

Strange Situation Video Clip

Insecure/Avoidant/Ambivalent Attachments Video

Free Response Question #1 of 2008 AP Psychology Exam included a section where students were asked to “summarize one main idea or finding” from Mary Ainsworth’s studies on attachment.

Students were then asked to “provide a specific example of actions the Smith-Garcias (a fictitious set of parents) might take to raise their child to produce positive outcomes” in the area of self-reliance using Ainsworth’s theories.

Harry Harlow- Big Idea “Contact Comfort”

Picture shows that  the infant monkey would cling to the cloth mother even when the wire mother had the nursing bottle.

Picture shows that the infant monkey would cling to the cloth mother even when the wire mother had the nursing bottle.

Harry Harlow’s Study with Infant Monkeys Video

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About victoriaruss

I teach World History, Civics, AP Psychology, and AP Government at West Bladen High School.
This entry was posted in Unit 9 Developmental Psychology and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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